Bats made in Sri Lanka get ICC approval

AIPS
Bats made in Sri Lanka get ICC approval

Sahan Dickmadugodage, born to a Sri Lankan family in Australia, a staunch supporter of Sri Lanka Cricket and a staunch believer in due returns for commitment, had chosen Sri Lanka as the manufacturing hub for his dream

COLOMBO: Coming from down under back to his country of origin, Sahan Dickmadugodage, born to a Sri Lankan family in Australia, a staunch supporter of Sri Lanka Cricket and an staunch believer in due returns for commitment, had chosen Sri Lanka as the manufacturing hub for his dream that is intended to go global. In fact, he has taken Sri Lanka into the books of the International Cricket Council, as his Staunch Sport branded cricket bats were graced with the ICC approval for standard products to be used in any ICC tournaments.
Opened a door, a gate and a horizon, Sahan and his Staunch bats are now ready to go into the hands of world’s renowned cricketers, waving another made in Sri Lankan product in the centre of attraction of a loved sport in the country.
Determined to make it big, the young entrepreneur has got very clear plans for the company’s future. He wants to go global and he wants to make into all sports, being a renowned brand in sports marketing.
What made you think of making cricket bats? “When I came to Lanka in 2017 on a holiday I noticed cricket bats were expensive, some were more than the bats in Australia. During April 2017, I thought of making cricket bats in Sri Lanka. When I realised cricket bats weren't made in Sri Lanka, I thought I could make them at a much cheaper price as wages were lower in SL as compared to Australia and England,” he says.
Now that the bats have ICC endorsement, Sahan explains about the standard of the bats he has to produce. “The standard of our bats and stickers have a certain guidelines set by the ICC that we cannot go over. We have our own measuring gauges for the bats and stickers. So we can be 100% sure that our bats are up to regulation standards.”
When asked how does he intent to convince a cricketer to change his bat to his brand, he said: “Honestly I don’t want to convince anybody about the bat. The bat speaks for itself! A proper player comes in and pretty much from the first minute compliments the bat before he evens picks it up. I barely do any of the talking. I let my bats do the talking rather scoring…”
Just relate a few important milestones in your life related to your dream product? “It started in June 2017, when I dropped myself out of my university and returning to Sri Lanka was my biggest milestone; I knew there was pretty much no turning back after that decision. In the same year, I had to sell my car to find some finances to my dream project. I also got shafted by a Pakistani supplier where I lost about 8 lakh. In July 2018, I got two partners to the company to help me out and later in the year I flew back to Australia to find investors, Thereafter, in a year’s time, I started trading as a bat manufacturer and in six month since then in February 2020, I was able to get the ICC approval.”
It is Staunchsport, so obviously, cricket is not only your target? “Definitely not just cricket, I not only plan to make pads, gloves and cricket balls in Sri Lanka, but I plan this is going to be a gateway for other sports equipment to be made in Sri Lanka. I am 100% confident once the bats are being made it should run its course,” he signed off.